Home > Erich Maria Remarque, From Critical Views > Reading All Quiet On the Western Front

Reading All Quiet On the Western Front

Erich Maria Remarque belonged to a French family that left France to Germany during the french Revolution. While in his late teens, at eighteen, he entered the army and was sent to the western front during the WW I. He lost his friends and relatives during this war. The book is about his and his friends experiences at the war. The front page says that: “The book is neither an accusation nor a confession and least of all an adventure, for death is not an adventure to those who stand face to face with it. It will try simply to tell of a generation of men who, even though they may have escaped its shells were destroyed by the war.”

There is a hilarious description of the origin of phrase ‘laterine-rumor’. Inspite that it may make you laugh, it makes you reflect on the plight of the young teenage soldiers devoid of any care, love and concern. They have lost any considerations and think only rationally. They think the use and not the sentiments behind it.The young genenaration is no more young. They are old folks – with weak parental support, no girls, no family, no school, no fun. Nothing remains but the ghastly war and its awaited consequences.

The description of drills at the barracks is quite vivid. Really classy. It talks about the drill master, a ex-postman who is disliked. Funny and exasperating is the concept of ‘self-learning.’ The young soldiers go to the front only after taking vengeance from the drill master by dumping him in the mud.

I will write tommorow more as I read further tonight. But I can’t wait for a long reading session on this coming weakend. It will also mean a trip to Crossword accross the road! Ah! The Weekends!

I better not carry any money with me at the crossword…else…a chidding at home awaits me!

Dated: 9/07/2006 on Critical Views

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